42,000-Year-Old Baby Woolly Mammoth Found In Russia

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A well preserved 42,000-year-old baby Woolly Mammoth was found in Russia in May 2007, she recently arrived in Hong Kong to educate the public around the world about the incredible Woolly Mammoth species, an ancestor of modern day elephants.

Lyuba was discovered by a Nenets reindeer breeder Yuri Khudi and his sons, in Russia’s Arctic Yamal Peninsula. Khudi recognized that Lyuba was a baby mammoth and that it was an important find; Khudi notified the local museum director about the find, who arranged the authorities to fly Serotetto and Khudi back to the location of the find on the Yuribey river. However, they found that Lyuba’s remains had disappeared. Suspecting that profiteers may have taken the mammoth, Khudi and Serotetto drove to a nearby settlement called Novy Port. There they discovered Lyuba’s carcass exhibited outside a local store. It turned out that the store owner bought the body from Khudi’s cousin, who removed the body from its original location, in exchange for two snowmobiles. Lyuba’s body suffered minor damage in the process, with dogs having chewed off her right ear and a part of her tail, but remained largely intact. With the help of the police, Khudi and Serotetto reclaimed the body and had it transported by helicopter to the Shemanovsky Museum in Salekhard. In gratitude for Khudi’s role, the museum officials named the mammoth calf “Lyuba”, meaning “Love”), after the first name of Khudi’s wife.

Most of Lyuba’s parts remain intact, including her undercoat and hair. Scientists around the world have collaborated to study her using cutting edge technology to find out how she passed away, to provide more information about mammoths at the end of the last Ice Age.

Scientists from Russia and South Korea hope to clone mammoths at a lab devoted to the venture, according to the Moscow Times.

We hope that enough people will become educated as a result of the discovery of Lyuba and help to save their closest relatives, modern day Asian and Africa Elephants before it’s too late. Join The Herd!

Source: Wikipedia 

Moscow Times 

 

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