Tiny Saw-Whet Owl Found In Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree After Traveling 170 Miles To New York City

A tiny saw-whet owl is now recovering at the Ravensbeard Wildlife Center in New York after being found in the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. 

It all started when a 75-foot Norway spruce was cut down on Thursday in Oneonta, New York, for Rockefeller Center’s Christmas display. It was then when a worker for the company that helped transport the tree, noticed the small owl.

According to a post on Ravensbeard Wildlife Center’s Facebook page, the worker’s wife had contacted them asking if they took in owls for rehabilitation, thankfully they did.

After the tiny owl, who has now been named Rockefeller, was turned over to the wildlife center, they immediately performed a health check. Despite his 170-mile journey, he appeared to be in good health.

“We’ve given him fluids and are feeding him all the mice he will eat. It had been three days since he ate or drank anything. So far so good, his eyes are bright and he seems relatively in good condition with all he’s been through,” said Ravensbeard Wildlife Center in a Facebook post. “Once he checks in with the vet and gets a clean bill of health, he’ll be released to continue on his wild and wonderful journey.”

Ravensbeard Wildlife Center has been a refuge for injured and orphaned wildlife for over 20 years. However, five years ago, the center was forced to relocate, and since then, they have been set up as a temporary rehab shelter. This year, they took in over 150 birds – way beyond their capacity.

The Center has recently partnered with Hootsuite to help tell the story of Rockefeller the owl, using #socialforgood to ensure his safe return to his natural habitat, and to support the work this organization does at their rescue center.

Please donate today to help Ravensbeard Wildlife Center not only care for Rockefeller, but for all of the animals that they continue to rescue, rehabilitate, and release HERE!

Although the tiny owl did not sustain any injuries from the transportation, it is important for us to point out that this selected tree was most likely home to many other wild species. We hope Rockefeller Center can one day move towards a more ecological solution, instead of cutting down these beautiful trees for their Christmas display.

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